Radio Newsbeat

Waffler

The weather has been variable, with lots of rain.  The rain seemed to affect my DAB reception on the new National Multiplex.  Plenty to listen to on the first National Multiplex, Radio 4 which is a fantastic speech station, still LBC and now Talk Radio fail to emulate the quality of Radio 4’s output.  I do realise that Radio 4 has a massive staff and the programmes range from news to documentary and drama, with the bonus of panel and specialist shows.

Amazed today to read that Tony Hall DG of the BBC earns £450,000 a year.  There are plenty of people who travel from Henley on Thames where he lives to London, and pay a fortune to British Rail for the privilege.  Am I merely jealous of someone who earns that amount. Fortunately not, just think it is so unfair when talented staff in the BBC think themselves lucky on £26,000 upwards, but not up to £450,000.

News selected from the Radio Today Site

Memorial service planned for Sir Terry Wogan
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Memorial service planned for Sir Terry Wogan
BBC Radio 2 has announced a Service of Thanksgiving for Sir Terry Wogan will take place at Westminster Abbey later this year.

 

The event is taking place on September 27 – the 50th anniversary of Terry broadcasting on the BBC as he began presenting on the BBC Light Programme on 27 September 1966.

Further details will be announced soon by the BBC.

 

Jazz FM celebrates BBC Radio Awards win
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Jazz FM celebrates BBC Radio Awards win

The team at Jazz FM are celebrating their most recent award win, at the internal BBC Radio Awards this week.

They won as part of a collaboration between Jazz FM and BBC Music taking home the Best Collaboration Award the first time a commercial radio station has been part of a winning entry.

BBC Music Jazz was a pop up digital radio station broadcast on both Jazz FM and the BBC during the EFG London Jazz Festival last November, capitalising on an existing BBC Radio 3 partnership with the festival. It featured programmes from BBC personalities Jamie Cullum, Claire Teal, and Alan Shipton, while Chris Philips and Helen Mayhew provided exclusive versions of Jazz FM’s content. Helen also co-presented the Top 50 Greatest Jazz Artists public vote programmes with BBC Radio 3’s Jeffrey Smith highlighting the collaborative approach on air.

Jazz FM’s launch concert from 1990 with Ella Fitzgerald was re-broadcast while “Neil and Dud – the Other Side of Dudley Moore” was aired to much praise and acclaim. This programme is also nominated at next week’s Arqiva Commercial Radio Awards.

Jazz FM’s Content Director Nick Pitts, who collected the award with BBC Music Editor James Stirling and BBC Music Jazz Executive Producer Lindsay Pell told RadioToday: “Jazz is all about collaboration – different skills working together in harmony. How apt that our collaboration with BBC Music has been honoured in such a way. It is fantastic that such a trail blazing project has been recognised. I’m really proud of this achievement.”

James Stirling, BBC Music Editor commented: “The audience reaction to BBC Music Jazz was fantastic and to have been recognised by our peers as well is truly gratifying. The Jazz FM collaboration was the first time the BBC had partnered with a commercial radio station and we wanted to do it both for jazz fans and those curious about the music. It seemed a natural fit to work with Jazz FM and luckily for us, they all felt the same!”

Alan Davey, Controller of BBC Radio 3: “At BBC Radio 3 our mantra is to bring remarkable music and culture to our audiences and we are always on the look out to work with the industry because at the end of the day we’re ‘all in it together’! BBC Music Jazz was a fantastic opportunity to curate content from our commercial radio friends at Jazz FM, other jazz content across the BBC and it capitalised on Radio 3’s existing jazz strands and partnership with Serious for the EFG London Jazz Festival. I’m delighted it’s been recognised as a model of good working by our colleagues and we continue to work together to this day!”
Notes to Editors:

In photograph: Mim Shaikh (1xtra/award presenter), Nick Pitts (Content Director, Jazz FM), Lindsay Pell (Executive Producer, BBC Music Jazz), James Stirling (Editor, BBC Music).

BBC stations join UKRD’s Local Radio Day
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BBC stations join UKRD’s Local Radio Day

BBC Surrey and BBC Sussex have added their names to those already celebrating Local Radio Day on May 27th.

 

Together with several community stations and almost two dozen local commercial stations, the two BBC local radio stations add further to the momentum the day is gathering as more stations get on board.

Assistant Editor of the BBC stations, Mark Carter said, “I’m delighted that BBC Sussex and BBC Surrey are supporting this initiative, celebrating all that is great about local radio. In a multi-media world, there is most definitely still place for stations like ours, guiding listeners through the news stories that really matter to them.”

The website set up to promote Local Radio Day is filling up rapidly with station endorsements, political and celebrity support and information about the day itself.

“We are delighted that we are seeing some serious traction for this initiative and it’s great that so many stations delivering local radio to their communities are coming together to mark and celebrate all that is great about this part of our industry,” said UKRD’s Chief Executive Officer, William Rogers.

“BBC local radio plays an important part in the radio landscape and it’s terrific to have some of their stations on board with this initiative,” he said. “We have been amazed at the level of interest and there are many others who are talking to us about getting on board. It’s great that the operators of proper local radio can come together in this way.”

“This must be the first time, possibly ever, that local commercial, local BBC and local community stations have all come together to celebrate what they do and trumpet the successes of everything local,” said Rogers

Digital Radio Tick Mark installers hit 1000

Digital Radio Tick Mark installers hit 1000

There are now over 1000 registered Digital Radio Tick Mark installers at car retailers and dealerships across the UK.

The news was announced by Digital Radio UK today at the World DAB Drive to Digital conference in Brussels.

Speaking at the conference, Ford Ennals, CEO, Digital Radio UK, said the 1000 installers are the first to have completed a training and accreditation programme verifying their ability to fit digital radio in vehicles and qualifying them to use the Digital Radio Tick Mark when promoting their services as fitters of in-vehicle digital radios and adapters.

Supported by Government, the Society for Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT), and the automotive industry, the Digital Radio Installer Tick Mark was introduced in June 2014 to provide consumers with greater assurance when choosing an installer to fit a DAB digital radio into their vehicle. The accreditation scheme for aftermarket retail installers is managed by the professional association for the sector, the Institute of the Motor Industry (IMI).

The first 1000 registered installers are comprised of fitters at Halfords stores, independent retailers, Vauxhall dealerships and Volkswagen dealerships, with many more to follow. Halfords are committed to ensuring a registered Tick Mark installer is available in all of their 470 stores.

Digital Radio UK has launched a Digital Radio Installer Tick Mark Store Finder to allow drivers to find their nearest registered Digital Radio Tick Mark installer. The Store Finder will feature in the digital radio Summer communications campaign voiced by motoring broadcaster Suzi Perry, highlighting the availability of digital radios and adapters, and directing drivers to the website to find a registered Tick Mark installer near them.

Over 33 million drivers listen to radio in their vehicles but only 20% of listening in vehicles is to digital, as compared to 49.3% at home.

Ford Ennals, CEO, Digital Radio UK, said: “Reaching a thousand registered installers is a terrific milestone. With the majority of new cars now coming with digital radio as standard, our priority is to let drivers know that it is simple to convert their current vehicle to digital radio, and ensure that the help they need to enjoy the benefits of digital radio on the road is at hand.”

Radio Lancashire’s 24 hour emergency broadcast
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Radio Lancashire’s 24 hour emergency broadcast

All day Thursday, BBC Radio Lancashire is on a 24 hour mission with continuous coverage of Lancashire’s emergency services.

The station starts at 0600 Thursday and will continue till the same time on Friday with reporters broadcasting live with police, fire crews, and paramedics throughout the 24 hours, following events as they happen. There will also be special reports from the county’s lifeboat crews and mountain rescue teams.

Some of the key moments expected throughout the day include:

  • Breakfast, presented by Graham Liver, will come live from Lancashire Police HQ at Hutton, looking behind the scenes with fire-arms and dog units.
  • From 0930, Sally Naden and Brett Davison will officially open the new Broughton Ambulance Station live on their show.
  • At 1200 John Gillmore takes the helm live from the Lancashire Fire and Rescue Training Centre at Washington Hall in Chorley. He’ll see firefighters put through their paces on exercises and have a go himself.
  • Gary Hickson from 1600 will be live at Rossendale and Pendle Mountain Rescue Team’s HQ in Burnley discovering how the volunteers risk their lives to save others every year.

Through the evening and overnight there will be reporters across the county showing the reality of what Lancashire’s emergency services have to face.

Then the next day, on the Friday morning (13th), BBC Radio Lancashire will talk to the chief constable, chief fire officer and a director of the ambulance trust about any issues the day highlights.

Pop Up Radio service to cease on DAB digital radio
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Pop Up Radio service to cease on DAB digital radio

The Pop Up radio service on 18 DAB multiplexes across the UK is to close in its current format.

Ofcom has given the go-ahead for the changes, once Angel Radio has ended its run on the channel on May 15th.

Over the years, Pop Up Radio has broadcast the Manx Grand Prix, a French radio station and Celtic Music Radio.

The service has been available in Ayr, Berkshire and North Hampshire, Bristol, Cambridge, Cornwall, Coventry, Essex, Kent, Leicestershire, Norfolk, Nottinghamshire, Peterborough, Plymouth, South East Wales, Sussex, Swindon and West and South Wiltshire, Wolverhampton and Shropshire but not used as often as its owners would have anticipated.

Pop Up Radio tells us they are still open to running Pop Up Radio stations in the future on an ad-hoc basis but the current structure will no longer operate.

Pete Waterman joins two BBC local radio stations
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Pete Waterman joins two BBC local radio stations

BBC WM 95.6 and BBC Coventry and Warwickshire 94.8 have hired Pete Waterman to host a weekend show during the summer.

Pete will present his new show from next Saturday from 4-6pm on the two stations. The show is called “Pete Waterman – Back to my roots” and will celebrate the very best of Birmingham & the Black Country with memories, guests, music, and listeners phoning-in.

Pete Waterman was last heard at Smooth Radio where he hosted a weekly disco show across the UK.

He says: “I care passionately about the West Midlands – it’s where I started and it’s the part of the country with the very best people. I can’t wait to talk to listeners to and share some stories”

BBC WM’s Editor Sarah Harness said: “The listeners are in for a huge treat – Pete oozes passion for the West Midlands” She added, “Pete is a legend, it’s a show that I’m sure listeners will love!”

BBC Coventry & Warwickshire’s Editor Andrew Bowman added: “I’m thrilled that Pete will be joining the station. The show will be packed with brilliant nostalgia and memories”. He added, “Pete is a Coventry legend, it’s a show that I’m sure listeners will love!”

Compare the Market.com

I used the energy switch firm compare the market.com, and was told to look forward to receiving a Meerkat of my choice.  It took many months to receive an email telling me that my Meerkat toy was in Paris.  Today this gem of an email arrived!  At least my Meerkat knows how long it takes Royal Mail to deliver parcels and post!

LOOKING FORWARDS TO MEETING YOU!

Dear *<* ,

I am arrived in United Kingdoms and I am very excite because I get to travel in Royal Mail – which I think is even more luxurious than business class!

They say it will take 7 working days (I think royal of her heiresses is not good at driving!)

You can still follow my travels from Meerkovo using the Toy Tracker oncomparethemeerkat.com or visit the FAQsespage if you have any questionings.

See you soon,

Postkat

This advert is for insurance but it also applies if you take up a recommendation for changing power suppliers!

Pictorial Musings

Lovely sunshine here today, hope the same is true where you are!

34-DSC_0182

Sorry if you are not keen on spiders, this was in our shed covered in dust and cobwebs, so I freed him.  This is a close up of a very small creature.

A song by the Who with a clever video from You Tube.

DSCF9988

A prehistoric circle of stones at Stonor Park in Oxfordshire.  The grass is trimmed very well around them as well!

A song relevant to the lovely weather today, but launched during the depression after the war to lift people’s spirits.

If you like this type of music, and other material from the 40s to 60s etc. Try Angel Radio that has turned up on the Pop Up channels on many DAB digital radio multiplexes. If you cannot get it on air, try this link http://angelradio.co.uk/listen/4530928991

Something now hopefully to lift your spirits

 

  • Knock, knock. Who’s there? Canoe! Canoe who? Canoe come out and play with me today?
  • Knock, knock. Who’s there? Who! Who who? That’s what an owl says!
  • Knock, knock. Who’s there? Lettuce. Lettuce who? Lettuce in, it’s cold out here.
  • Knock, knock. Who’s there? Honey bee. Honey bee who? Honey bee a dear and get me some juice.
  • Knock, knock. Who’s there? Wooden shoe. Wooden shoe who? Wooden shoe like to hear another joke?
  • Knock, knock. Who’s there? A broken pencil. A broken pencil who. Oh never mind it’s pointless.
  • Knock, knock. Who’s there? Cow says. Cow says who? No silly, a cow says Mooooo!

This is available at http://www.howtodothings.com/electronics/how-to-tune-a-radio-dial – seems to be rather pointless to me.

How To Tune a Radio Dial

Radio dial

Are you fond of listening to radios? Have you ever had a hard time in tuning a radio dial? Tuning to your favorite radio station can sometimes be tricky, especially when you are using a clock radio where you need steady fingers to move the tuner accurately to your desired station. However, with practice and maybe with some tips, one can learn how to easily tune a radio dial.

Here are some tips on how to tune a radio dial:

    1. Pressing the tuner or the knob firmly while moving it will help you in making your movements steady. You should also avoid moving the tuner too fast, as you do not want to skip right past to your desired station or get on the wrong station. It might also be a help if the tuner of the stereo can easily be handled with fingers.
    2. Turn your volume to the medium level. Volume that is too low or too high might make it difficult for you to identify a station, as it would dwarf the voices of the radio host.
    3. Do not forget to check your FM indicator. It is an LED that turns on when you have tuned in to an FM station whose signal is received well.
  1. When you have successfully tuned in to your desired station, look at your radio dial and try to memorize or remember its position. It will help you in the future to know on what position your dial should be for each station.
  2. If preset buttons are available in your radio, then it is advisable to set your selection of stations in an orderly manner. For example, if you tune in to stations 101.1, 102.7, and 101.9, presetting it in an ascending order where 101.1 will be followed by 101.9 which will then be followed by 102.7 will help you to remember your presets easily. It will also help you to easily select the stations without looking, especially when you are driving or doing something. It will also make it easier for you to key them back again in case you forgot them.
  3. Devices that might cause interference should also be move away from the radio. Poor signal reception can be boosted by attaching a metallic material to the antenna of the radio. You might also want to raise the height of the radio’s antenna.

With the rapid growth of technology, radio dials are now becoming unpopular on modern radios. But if you still have one of those old radios at home or in the car, either because you prefer it over the modern ones or you cannot afford to buy a new one, keeping these tips in mind might be of help to you. Anyway, it is up to you to practice them. But if you have the money, you might want to consider buying a digital tuning clock radio that is easy to read and is more accurate.

 

 To end this short posting – an unexpected  visitor turns up in this how to do video!

 

Radio Hauraki

Radio Pioneer And Radio Hauraki Founder Chris Parkinson Dies Aged 74

Award-winning broadcaster and Radio Hauraki co-founder Chris Parkinson has died, just days before his 75th birthday.

Parkinson founded the iconic radio station, which turns 50 this December, alongside David Gapes, Denis O’Callahan and Derek Lowe.

Together, the men are credited with introducing New Zealand listeners to bands such as The Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, Led Zeppelin and more.

From the Hauraki site

Newsbeat

Waffler

The BBC 50s music station on DAB is very entertaining – well worth listening to.  It is also currently available On Demand, so if you missed the first section of the 4 day programme here is the link to the page of live and previous programmes.  Bless the BBC! http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p03lsql7

If you ever have problems with your PC, or want to see if you have malware or a virus on board, in spite of your anti-virus and firewall – try this online scanner:  http://www.eset.co.uk/Antivirus-Utilities/Online-Scanner . It is totally free, but involves downloading a small applet that scans you PC. It asks if you want to uninstall it when it has finished!

I have just discovered this radio station online.  It is dedicated to Gardening and is in English and sounds like they are all UK based presenters.   http://worldradiogardening.com/  It has periods when it plays back to back music.  So much radio now.

Dog and Cat radio is still on the air, it was launched some years ago – http://www.dogcatradio.com/

Still on the subject of PC’s, you can download Windows 10 and make a dvd of it, so you can load it on if you have a problem.  It took just under 2 hours to install a few days ago from such a DVD I made. Be sure to locate the media creation tool which is a short way down the page  https://www.microsoft.com/en-gb/software-download/windows10

Lyn Parsons was on BBC Radio Berkshire today instead of Tony Blackburn, she is a very competent presenter, and I enjoy her programmes very much indeed.

 

News Selected from the Radio Today Site:

For daily radio news visit http://radiotoday.co.uk/

Tributes paid to BBC Radio Cornwall’s Ted Gundry
Posted by Radio Today Staff

Tributes paid to BBC Radio Cornwall’s Ted Gundry

ed Gundry – a founding member of BBC Radio Cornwall – has died after a long illness at the age of 81.

He was known as the voice of the station for many years, which has been reflecting on his life since the news was announced yesterday.

A Facebook    on the BBC Radio Cornwall page says: “Some sad news to share with you – one of the founding members of the BBC Radio Cornwall family Ted Gundry has died in hospital at the age of 81. We’ll be reflecting on the career of the much-loved broadcaster on air on BBC Radio Cornwall and we’d love to hear your memories of him.”

Listeners and colleagues have been paying tribute and you can hear some of his work below from Radio Moments, including the announcement of his passing.

 

Radiocentre urges a more distinctive BBC
Posted by Radio Today Staff

Radiocentre urges a more distinctive BBC

The BBC should welcome the drive towards more distinctive radio services as part of Charter Review, according to Radiocentre.

Speaking at the Westminster Media Forum conference on BBC Charter Review and the impact on the wider creative market Siobhan Kenny, CEO of Radiocentre, said that the focus on improving the distinctiveness of BBC radio would ultimately provide listeners with an even greater choice of high quality content and avoid too much duplication at peak times.

Siobhan Kenny said: “The BBC has nothing to fear if the outcome of Charter Review is that services like Radio 1 and Radio 2 are required to be more distinctive during peak hours and are more rigorously held to account by an external regulator.

This will be of benefit to listeners who will have access to a broader range of content available, enrich the offering of the BBC and help ensure a better balance in the UK radio market”.

Professional voice-over and former radio presenter Phil Sayer has died aged 62.

Phil worked at Piccadilly, Red Rose, GMR and Smooth FM, and was a newsreader on BBC North West Tonight as well.

He’ll be remembered for his announcements at railways stations across the South West, Waterloo, and (previously) Birmingham New Street. He is the voice of the the Underground too, being the voice that says Mind The Gap in London’s Northern, Piccadilly and Jubilee tube lines.

His wife and business partner Elinor Hamilton informed colleagues and friends less than two weeks ago that Phil would be stepping down from work due to a sudden decline in health after a two year battle with cancer.

A message on the company’s Facebook page today reads:

“Phil Sayer – voice of reason, radio, and railways. A dearly loved husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle and friend.

We are sorry to announce that this service terminates here.

Tributes have been paid on Phil’s Facebook page and our comments are open below.

 

Radio Academy West branch to celebrate local radio
Posted by Radio Today Staff

Radio Academy West branch to celebrate local radio

An evening celebrating radio made in the West will take place in Bristol next week with a panel of local radio professionals.

 

The Radio Academy West branch has organised the event, and includes representatives from BBC, commercial, community and student radio.

Branch Chair Nick Bull told RadioToday: “Find out about the latest thinking – what makes great radio and the growing importance of digital content. Afterwards you’ll be able to chat to the panel and other key players in the industry across the West.”

It’s taking place at the BBC Bristol Club on Whiteladies Road on Wednesday 20th April (Gain entrance via back gate security on Belgrave Road). Arrive at 1830 for a prompt start at 1900.

Although this is a free event – you must book your place by emailing nick.bull@bbc.co.uk before Tuesday 19th April.

It’s hosted by Heart breakfast’s Paulina Gillespie who started at the BBC in Wiltshire before being recruited by Heart [then GWR] for their new triple header Breakfast show. Paulina Paris and Ed have been presenting in Bristol and Somerset in total for 12 years.

The Panel is made up of:

Clare McGinn – Head of BBC Network Radio Production, Bristol.
James Stodd – Group Head of Imaging & Production for Celador Radio.
Faye Leneghan – Station Manager – Burst Radio.
Dom Chambers – Project Director – The Community Radio Foundation.
Jess Rudkin – Editor, BBC Radio Bristol.
Ben Poor – Creative Technologist – Global Radio.

Plus, attendees will be able to see a live demonstration of Global’s new online tool “Soundcheck”.

The Hub community radio station to stay on-air
Posted by Radio Today Staff

The Hub community radio station to stay on-air

Community radio station The Hub will remain on-air for the foreseeable future thanks to offers of outside investment.

The Cornwall station announced last week week it would be closing down but today says it will continue to broadcast with new directors joining the board.

Station Manager Pete Appleyard said “I’m so happy to be able to announce that we’ll be staying on-air for the foreseeable future. With this new investment and appointments to the board, we’re all feeling reinvigorated and looking forward to an exciting future for The Hub.

“We’re a community radio station, run completely by volunteers and although we’re making this announcement, we always need help and support – both financial and in terms of volunteers. If you’re a good communicator and have a passion for music and the local community, we’d love to hear from you.

The Hub has been on-air since the summer of 2014 and broadcasts on 106.1 and 106.4 FM plus online.

Full programme schedule for BBC Radio 2 50s

Full programme schedule for BBC Radio 2 50s

BBC Radio 2’s latest pop-up station, Radio 2 50s will broadcast on DAB from 14-17 April, and here’s the full schedule for the four days.

Thursday 14th April

12pm – 1pm
Sounds of the 50s with Leo Green
In this the first of Leo Green’s pop up shows for Radio 2 50s, he features music by the biggest vocal groups of the 50s as well as recalling the stories behind the songs.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Leo Green, Producer/Terry Carter

**

1pm – 2pm
My Buddy & I: Chris and Noah Evans
In a one hour special, Chris Evans and his son Noah share their love for the music of an artist that bridges generations, the brilliant Buddy Holly.

The father and son team are bringing the time they spend travelling in the car together – accompanied by classic cassette tapes of the 50s star – to the Radio 2 listeners.

“Noah is so excited, especially as there’ll be ‘no sport or travel’, ‘just us and Buddy’!”

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenters/Chris Evans and Noah Evans, Producer/James Carpenter

**

2pm – 3pm
Jamie Cullum’s 50s Jazz
Jamie Cullum picks his favourite tracks from one of the most important decades in jazz.

The fifties saw the evolution of the music through bebop, cool jazz and hard bop; the emergence of stars and innovators like Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Chet Baker, Sonny Rollins and Dave Brubeck; and it also saw the heyday of the great jazz vocalists like Ella Fitzgerald, Frank Sinatra and Billie Holiday.

In this show, Jamie picks some of his favourite tracks from the fifties and tells the stories of the men and women who made them.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Jamie Cullum, Producer/Karen Pearson for Folded Wing

**

3pm – 4pm
Art of Artists – 50s Stars
Russell Davies revisits The Art of Artists archive to celebrate some of the biggest names in music from the 1950s. Through archive interviews with Hank Marvin, Petula Clark, Engelbert Humperdinck and Dame Vera Lynn, Russell showcases the wide musical variety of the decade.

Hank Marvin shares memories of learning the banjo while being influenced by early rock ‘n’ roll legends like Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly, as well as early days working with Cliff Richard.

Petula Clark and Engelbert Humperdinck remember the beginnings of their recording careers during the decade, and Dame Vera Lynn explains how her career continued to flourish after her role as ‘The Force’s Sweetheart’ during the Second World War.

Russell weaves conversation alongside a soundtrack inspired by their careers.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Russell Davies, Producer/Sara Sesardic

**

4pm – 5pm
Richard Hawley
Fifties influenced singer-songwriter and guitarist Richard Hawley delves into his record collection to bring listeners an hour of his favourite 50s nuggets – from the raucous to the rare.

Listeners will be able to tune in to 6Music to hear a longer version of this show on Sunday 10 April at 4pm.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Richard Hawley, Producer/Adam Dineen

**

5pm – 7pm
Huey Morgan – 50s Number Ones
Huey Morgan runs down some of the UK number one hits of the 1950s

**

7pm – 8pm
Don Black’s 50s
Some of the happiest days of Don Black’s life were spent in Denmark Street in the Fifties. The street was better known as Tin Pan Alley and was once accurately called ‘two hundred yards of hokum.’ This was the centre of Britain’s thriving music industry and Don was there every day either working for the New Musical Express or one of the many music publishers that populated both sides of the street.

In this special programme, the multi-award winning lyricist recalls the many glittering stars and songwriters he rubbed shoulders with in those giddy unforgettable and very tuneful days.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 will be broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Don Black, Producer/Terry Carter

**

8pm – 9pm
Bob Harris 50s Country
Bob Harris selects his favourite country tracks from the 50s, a decade when country music was dominated by artists including Webb Pierce, Eddy Arnold, Hank Williams and Kitty Wells.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Bob Harris, Producer/Mark Hagen

**

9pm – 10pm
The Hour The Music Died
“The Day the Music Died” is a well-used phrase to describe the tragedy that extinguished three bright stars from the rock ‘n’ roll firmament: Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and The Big Bopper.

This docu-drama sets out to establish what may have happened in the final fateful hour before their plane crashed on that freezing February night near Clear Lake, Iowa in 1959.
Detailed research by the writers Richard Ward and Colin Birch unearthed a wealth of first-hand recollections to guide the revealing and emotional.

The singers’ final hour covers the end of their tumultuous gig at the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, the car journey to Mason City Municipal Airport through to boarding the hastily chartered Beechcraft Bonanza four-seat light aircraft. Who and why they chose to fly is documented in this bitter-sweet hour. The dialogue is interspersed with music from the three musicians as well as recreations of radio promos and reports of the time.

This programme was first heard on Radio 2 in 2009.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Producers/ Mik Wilkojc and Graham Pass for Apparatus Productions

**

10pm – 11pm
Song Stories : Mack the Knife
Andy Serkis takes a look at Mack the Knife, the second track under the spotlight in Radio 2’s Song Stories. It’s catchy, it swings and it’s instantly hummable. Few could mistake the opening notes of this smash hit, yet many would never dream that “Mack’” started life far removed from the glittering lights and dizzying heights of 1950s showbiz America.

Andy Serkis tells the phenomenal tale of how Mack moved from east to west, bad to good and a gritty tango to sugary pop. Listeners will hear from those who were there – Kurt Weills’ wife Lotte Lenya, George Avakian, who brought the song to Louis Armstrong, Ahmet Ertegun, who produced Bobby Darin’s rendition and his manager Steve Blauner.

Marianne Faithfull, Ute Lemper and Richard Butler (Psychedelic Furs) discuss what made them sing it; Alan Cumming talks about “being” Mack; and theatre composer Dominic Muldowney examines the different versions throughout the years and explains why Mack The Knife will be sticking around for a long time yet.

This programme was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2011.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Andy Serkis, Producer/Amy McGarrigle

**

11pm – midnight
Little Richard : A Whop Bop A Lua – A Whop Bam Boom
Huey Morgan celebrates one of the most outrageous performers in the history of rock music and explains why he has been such a major influence on generations of musicians, from The Beatles to Bruno Mars.

Little Richard has always claimed to be “the architect of rock and roll”, and history would seem to bear out his boast.

The man who grew up in a very religious family as Richard Penniman began performing on stage in 1945, incorporating the high energy antics of preachers he witnessed in his local Pentecostal churches in to his stage routine.

When rock ‘n’ roll exploded in the 50s Little Richard led the way with his over-the-top gospel-style singing, with moans and screams, accompanied by a combination of boogie-woogie and rhythm and blues. His frantically charged piano playing and raspy, shouted vocals on such classics as Tutti Frutti, Long Tall Sally and Good Golly, Miss Molly defined the dynamic sound of rock `n’ roll.

This new music, which included an original injection of funk into the rock ‘n’ roll beat, inspired many of the greatest recording artists that followed. Paul McCartney said that he idolized Little Richard when he was in school and always wanted to sing like him, while Mick Jagger called him “the originator” and “my first idol.”

Bob Dylan performed Little Richard songs on piano as a schoolboy in his first band and declared in his high school yearbook in 1959 that his ambition was “to join Little Richard”. And in 1966, Jimi Hendrix, who recorded and performed with Penniman from 1964 to 1965 and began to emulate him in appearance, was quoted as saying, “I want to do with my guitar what Little Richard does with his voice”.

This programme was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2012.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Huey Morgan, Producer/Des Shaw for Ten Alps TV Ltd

**

FRIDAY 15TH APRIL

12pm – 1pm
Sounds of the 50s with Leo Green
Leo Green features the stories behind the songs and the singers who filled the early years of the charts that were launched in the 50s and produced hits in a huge array of styles.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Leo Green, Producer/Mark Simpson

**

1pm – 2pm
Imelda May
Irish jazz, blues and rockabilly singing star Imelda May plays a selection of 50s tracks which have influenced her musical direction and career.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Imelda May, Producer/Mark Hagen

**

2pm – 3pm
Iggy Pop’s 50s
Iggy Pop, ‘The Godfather of Punk’, brings a version of his BBC Radio 6 Music show to Radio 2 50s.

Iggy gives a stateside insight into the decade alongside his guest, the veteran New York Times music critic Ben Ratliff. Listeners can catch up with a longer version of this show at bbc.co.uk/6music

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Iggy Pop, Producer/Adam Dineen

**

3pm – 4pm
Race with the Devil: The Gene Vincent Story
Gene Vincent is perhaps one of the first of the archetypal rock ‘n’ roll singers – his is a tragic story of excessive drink, drugs, women, fast motorbikes, horrific accidents and death at an early age.

He was only 36 when he died in 1971 from a ruptured stomach ulcer and his later years were not hugely successful in terms of his musical career – but those early years have ensured him a place amongst the greats of pop music. Songs like Woman Love, Bluejean Bop, Race with the Devil, Who Slapped John, Catman and of course Be-Bop-a-Lula have become classics and not just for Gene’s voice but for the musicianship of his band, the Blue Caps.

This programme, presented by Roger Daltrey, focusses on the late 50s, early 60s period and his influence on the British pop scene then and now. Musician interviewees include Eric Burdon, Ray Davies, Alvin Stardust, Fall frontman Mark E.Smith, Spencer Davis, guitarists Albert Lee and Adam Seymour, Doors drummer John Densmore, classic rocker Jerry Lee Lewis and Blue Caps Tommy Facenda and Dickie Harrell.

Family members to feature are Gene’s sister Tina Craddock and his daughter Sherri Vincent. There will also be extracts from Rex Weiner’s play, Be Bop a Lula, produced originally by Adam Ant and Lori Depp in various venues along Sunset Strip. The play, set in England in 1960, is about the relationship between Gene Vincent and Eddie Cochran on that last tour before Cochran’s accidental death. It stars Aaron DuPree as Gene Vincent and Chance Dean as Eddie Cochran.

There will also be an interview with biographer, John Collis, archive from Gene Vincent himself and some newly recorded tribute songs created by Sherri Vincent.

This programme was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2009.

It is being shown as part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Roger Daltrey, Producer/Neil Rosser for Ladbroke Productions

**

4pm – 5pm
James Dean: The Last Ten Weeks
Everyone grapples for a fresh angle on the life and death of Hollywood actor James Dean, and here we have it in documents locked away for more than half a century.

Essays and hundreds of pictures by critically acclaimed photographer Sanford Roth have come to light giving us a new insight into the life of an icon.

Hollywood actor Robert Wagner tells the story of Roth’s short but intense friendship with Dean over the summer of 1955. Roth (his words brought to life by actor Michael Xavier) paints a unique picture of a young man who, to many, has remained an enigma for decades.

Roth – who had photographed all the greats of the era befriended the young Dean while taking the stills pictures for his third and ultimately final film Giant.

Dean was fascinated by Roth’s work and over the ten weeks leading up to his death on September 30 1955 would forge a strong bond with Sandy and his wife Beulah.

Roth photographed Dean at work and at play – and was with him on the day he died.

In this programme listeners will hear Roth’s reflections on Dean – his acting, his friendships, his clashes on set, his enthusiasms and passions, his ambitions, his frustrations – and from it we can perhaps imagine what might have become of James Dean had he lived.

To paint a full picture of the young Dean that summer 60 years ago, the programme also hears from his young cousin Marcus Winslow Jnr, from his best friend Lew Bracker, from fellow racing enthusiast Bruce Kessler and from his Giant co-stars Jane Withers and Carrol Baker. There are contributions from Francesca Robinson Sanchez who was left Sanford Roth’s Dean Collection and from British film producer David Puttnam who was inspired by Dean.

This programme was first broadcast on Radio 2 in 2005.

It is being shown as part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Producer/Ashley Byrne for Made in Manchester

**

5pm – 6pm
Len Goodman – On the Air
Strictly judge Len Goodman enjoyed a happy childhood and teenage years growing up in 1950s London.

Pride of place in the Goodman living room was the radiogram – a fine piece of furniture with a cocktail cabinet on one side (for entertaining the neighbours) and a gramophone and radio on the other. After school Len would come home and play records on the gramophone. But it was the names on the radio dial that fascinated young Len – Luxembourg, Hilversum, Moscow, Vatican – faraway magical places.

Then, of course, there was the BBC Home, Light, and Third Programmes and Overseas Service. The arrival of commercial radio was still a good 20 years away – so the BBC had our full attention when it came to home listening.

Len Goodman, with the help of the BBC Archives and some back copies of the Radio Times, remembers the radio shows and stars on the 1950s. The programme includes memories of Jack Jackson, Two Way Favourites, Mantovani, Semprini, Music While You Work, Take It From Here and Educating Archie.

In Len’s second programme for Radio 2 50s he’ll take a look the television shows and stars of the decade.

This programme was first broadcast on Radio 2.

It is being shown as part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Len Goodman, Producer/Bridget Apps

**

6pm – 8pm
Friday Night is the Music – Fabulous Films of the 50s
As part of BBC Music’s ‘My Generation’ season, Friday Night Is Music Night presents a programme celebrating the fabulous film scores of the fifties.

Among the movies featuring tonight are ‘Ben Hur’, ‘The Bridge on the River Kwai’ and ‘Singin in the Rain’ and some of the songs include ‘Who Wants To be A Millionaire’ from ‘High Society’, ‘The Deadwood Stage’ from ‘Calamity Jane’ and ‘Diamonds Are A Girl’s Best Friend’ from the Marilyn Monroe classic ‘Gentlemen Prefer Blondes’.

Jazz singer Joe Stilgoe and West End star Louise Dearman join BBC Radio 2’s ‘Sound of the 50s’ presenter Leo Green and the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by Michael England, for this special edition recorded at the Hackney Empire.

Producer/Anthony Cherry

**

8pm – 9pm
Desmond Carrington 50s Special – Side 2
Desmond Carrington continues his regular 50s Nights on BBC Radio 2 with a special “Side 2”, containing an eclectic collection of the stars from the most diverse of all decades of popular music. It was a time when Desmond was in his twenties and working hard in both radio and television.

This programme was first broadcast on Radio 2. It is being shown as part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

Presenter/Desmond Carrington, Producer/Dave Aylott for Foldback Media Ltd

SATURDAY 16TH APRIL

10am – 11am
Bill Kenwright’s 50s Golden Years
Bill Kenwright plays some of his favourite tracks from his golden years of the fifties. Expect to hear a story song, an amazing b-side and of course something from The King.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Bill Kenwright, Producer/Fiona Day

**

11am – midday
Marty Wilde
Marty Wilde was a rock ’n’ roll pioneer in the late 50s as part of the very first generation of Pop Stars.

He was discovered by impresario Larry Parnes at London’s Condor Club in 1957, when he was just 17.

Between 1958 and 1962 Marty had 13 consecutive hit records including Endless Sleep, Donna, Teenager in Love, Sea Of Love and Bad Boy. He appeared on the ground breaking 50s TV shows Oh Boy, Boy Meets Girl and Six Five Special and shared his passion for music with contemporaries including Billy Fury, Tommy Steele and Cliff Richard.

Marty went on to give Justin Hayward his first break in The Wilde Three, wrote for Lulu, The Casuals, Status Quo and with his daughter Kim, who sold millions of records in the 1980s.

In his show on Radio 2 50s, Marty will be sharing many of his unique anecdotes alongside favourite artists from the decade that first made him a star.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.
Presenter/Marty Wilde, Producer/Mark Simpson

**

12pm – 1pm
Sounds of the 50s with Leo Green
As well as the mainstream charts, the 50s celebrated Blues, Rhythm & Blues and Soul music with their own charts. And in this programme presenter Leo Green plays the hits by the music of the kings and queens on the genres, as well as recalling their lives and stories behind their music.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Leo Green, Producer/Mark Simpson

**

1pm – 2pm
Sheila Hancock – Hancock’s Whole Hour
Award-winning actress and writer Sheila Hancock looks back on her time in rep and starting out in films during the 50s – with her own special guests and the music she remembers being the soundtrack to her decade.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Sheila Hancock, Producer/Mark Sandell

**

2pm – 3pm
Clare Teal’s Big Band Ballroom
Clare delves into the vast array of big band sounds from the 1950s picking out the fabulous hi-fi sound of Count Basie with April in Paris, Duke Ellington’s Satin Doll, Ted Heath’s Hot Toddy and Stan Kenton and Nat King Cole with Orange Coloured Sky.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Clare Teal, Producer/Cali Snook

**

3pm – 5pm
Huey Morgan – 50s Number Ones
Huey Morgan runs down all the UK number one hits of the 1950s

**

5pm – 6pm
Mark Radcliffe’s 50s Folk
Mark Radcliffe presents classic music from the start of the folk revival.

During the 1950s, folk music surged in popularity on both sides of the Atlantic. Folk clubs and record labels in New York and London led the movement, connecting young people with their musical heritage and making serious political statements.

In the UK, Ewan MacColl founded his ‘Ballads and Blues’ club and alongside characters like A.L. Lloyd (Bert Lloyd) he helped nurture a scene that would blossom and grow for more than 20 years, and continues to exist today.

For many, the skiffle craze of 1956-58 was a gateway to folk. Glasgow musician Lonnie Donegan helped start the phenomenon with his 1955 hit ‘Rock Island Line’ – the first record certified Gold in Britain, and a top ten single in the States. Folk acts like Martin Carthy were among those swept up by the craze.

Political aspects of the folk revival led to controversy and serious drama. In America, The Weavers (including Pete Seeger) were hugely popular before being blacklisted by the US government for having Communist sympathies. In 1955 they reunited for a famous concert at New York’s Carnegie Hall, that was recorded for a classic album.

Paul Robeson, the singer, actor and civil-rights activist was similarly banned from working in America; in 1956 he released a version of worker’s anthem ‘Joe Hill’ via Topic Records in the UK. The song was later covered by Joan Baez, The Dubliners and Bruce Springsteen.

Classic folk recordings from the 1950s include those by Isla Cameron, Shirley Collins, Odetta, and The Kingston Trio. The BBC’s influential Radio Ballads, with songs by MacColl and Peggy Seeger, came at the end of the decade.

Join Mark Radcliffe as he celebrates a remarkable time in the history of folk music.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Mark Radcliffe, Producer/Jon Lewis for Smooth Ops

**

6pm – 7pm
Stuart Maconie’s Fifties Freakier Zone
Stuart Maconie brings his BBC 6 Music show to Radio 2 50s, as he looks at the alternative music of the 1950s, from the modal jazz of John Coltrane to the beginnings of minimalism and the pioneering work of John Cage.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Stuart Maconie’s Freak Zone broadcasts every Sunday at 8pm and Stuart Maconie’s Freakier Zone broadcasts every Sunday at midnight on 6Music.

Presenter/Stuart Maconie, Producer/Rebecca Gaskell

**

7pm – 8pm
Life with Lucy & Desi
Mariella Frostrup explains how husband and wife team Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz helped redefine American television in the 1950s and 60s – artistically, technically and geographically.

Together they formed Desilu productions, and their TV show I Love Lucy became one of the most successful TV shows of all time. They pioneered a number of methods still in use today and were instrumental in relocating TV production from New York to LA, where it has remained. They purchased the old RKO studios in Hollywood and turned it into the Desilu production centre which created The Untouchables, The Dick van Dyke Show, Mission: Impossible, I Spy and Star Trek amongst many other notable series. Lucy eventually bought out Desi and became one of the first female studio heads.

In 1960, Lucy and Desi divorced and I Love Lucy series came to an end. Lucy and Desi remained close friends right up until Desi died in 1986. Lucy’s TV comedy series continued in the form of The Lucy Show (1962–68) and Here’s Lucy (1968–74) which featured her two real life children, Lucie Arnaz and Desi Arnaz Jnr. More recently, I Love Lucy was named the Greatest TV Series by Hall of Fame Magazine.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

This programme was first broadcast on BBC Radio 2 in 2009.

Presenter/Mariella Frostrup, Producer/Graham Pass and Mik Wilkojc for Ping Productions

**

8pm – 9pm
Len Goodman – On the Box
Strictly judge Len Goodman enjoyed a happy childhood and teenage years growing up in 1950s London.

In this second programme for the Radio 2 Fifties season Len turns his attention to television and recalls some of the favourite TV stars and programmes of the decade.

Though television was still in its infancy it was an era rich in ideas and formats – some of which still survive to this day. By the time of the Queen’s Coronation in 1953 more than a million homes had a TV set. No remote controls nor recorders or catch ups – 1950s set needed a good two minutes to warm up before people got to see a picture.

The programme includes memories of Billy Cotton Band Show, Joyce Grenfell, Eamonn Andrews, Six Five Special, Dixon of Dock Green, Juke Box Jury and Sunday Night at the London Palladium.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Len Goodman, Producer/Bridget Apps

SUNDAY 17TH APRIL

11am – midday
Steve Wright’s 50s Love songs
Steve Wright plays some favourite love songs from the 1950s, with dedications and real-life romance stories.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Steve Wright, Producer/Graham Albans

**

12pm – 1pm
Sounds of the 50s with Leo Green
In the third part of this special show for Radio 2 50s, Leo Green celebrates the lives and work of the founders of rock ‘n’ roll; artists who gave us so many of the musical foundations upon which pop music has been built.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Leo Green, Producer/Mark Simpson

**

1pm – 2pm
Michael Ball meets Doris Day
Michael Ball celebrates the career of the legendary Doris Day – hearing from some of her leading men and the whip-crack-away girl herself, who chats to Michael from her Californian home.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Michael’s interview with Doris was first broadcast on BBC Radio 2 in XXXXXXX.

Presenter/Michael Ball

**

2pm – 3pm
Paul Jones 50s R & B
Paul plays some of the most important blues artists of the 1950s.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Paul Jones, Producer/Bob McDowall

**

3pm – 4pm
Gary Williams – The Art of the Crooner
Big band and cabaret singer Gary Williams focusses on the 50s crooner, exploring the voices, styles and repertoire of a group of artists which included Frank Sinatra, Perry Como and Matt Monro.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Gary Williams, Producer/Anthony Cherry

**

4pm – 5pm
Sinatra in the UK
Leo Green tells the little known story of Sinatra’s 1953 tour of the UK.

Smarting from his failed marriage to Ava Gardner, his tax problems and worried about how his comeback movie ‘From Here To Eternity’ would be received, Sinatra spent two months in England and Scotland often playing to small audiences. People who saw the shows remember half empty houses but some brilliant live performances.

The programme features archive 1953 recordings from BBC Radio’s ‘Show Band Show’ and an unofficial tape from the Blackpool Opera House.

This programme was first broadcast on Radio 2 in November 2015.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Leo Green, Producer/Trevor Dann for Trevor Dann’s Company Ltd

**

5pm- 6pm
Suzi Quatro
Hollywood star and rock ‘n’ roll performer Suzi remembers the cream of female singing stars of the 1950s including music from Rosemary Clooney, Dinah Washington, the Poni-Tails, Doris Day, Debbie Reynolds and Dodie Stevens.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

This programme was first broadcast on Radio 2 in February 2010.

Presenter/Suzi Quatro

**

6pm – 7pm
Nick Stewart – Inside Track
Music industry veteran Nick Stewart looks at the business of the music industry in the 1950s, a decade which saw the launch of the first UK singles chart.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Presenter/Nick Stewart, Producer/Anthony Cherry

**

7pm – 8pm
The Eddie Cochran Story
Listeners are being given another chance to hear Joe Brown present a tribute to Eddie Cochran, 56 years after he was killed in a car accident.

Eddie met his tragically early death in Wiltshire, aged only 21. Although it’s startling how much he had achieved in his short life, his glittering future was snatched away on the night of 17 April 1960.

The list of his admirers is a long one and includes Rod Stewart, Marc Bolan, The Who, the Beach Boys and the Sex Pistols – all of whom have recorded his songs over the years. Eddie’s career was brief but his influence and popularity have been long lasting. His reputation as a founding father of rock ‘n’ roll music was confirmed when he was chosen as one of the first stars to be inducted into the Rock ‘n’ Roll Hall of Fame.

The programme features comments from admirers Robert Plant and George Harrison, guitarist and Cochran biographer Darrel Higham, rock historian Rob Finnis, British rock ‘n’ rollers Vince Eager and Marty Wilde, and Eddie’s recording engineer at Goldstar Studios, Stan Ross.

Plus there are archive interviews with Eddie Cochran from programmes in the USA, Australia and in the UK (BBC Radio’s Saturday Club and the TV programme Boy Meets Girls), plus rock ‘n’ roll classics: Somethin’ Else, Summertime Blues, C’Mon Everybody. Twenty Flight Rock, and Three Steps To Heaven.

This programme was first broadcast on BBC Radio 2 in February 2009.

This show is part of BBC Music: My Generation – a year-long landmark season of programming across BBC TV, Radio and Online charting the history of pop music across the decades, from the mid-1950s to mid-1990s through the memories of the people who were there. The season launches in April with a look at the decade of music from the mid-50s to mid-60s.

As part of the season, BBC Radio 2 is broadcasting Radio 2 50s, a pop-up DAB service on air from Thursday 14 to Sunday 17 April, which will celebrate the music and culture of the 1950s.

Producer/ Kevin Howlett / Howlett Media Productions

WCR airs tribute programmes to Beacon Radio
Posted by Radio Today Staff

WCR airs tribute programmes to Beacon Radio

Community radio station WCR has created a full weekend schedule of programmes to mark the launch of Beacon 303 40 years ago.

Kris Kennedy Jnr,(KKJ), Chris Harper, Munro Jack, Dick Fisher, Gordon Astley, Phil Brice, Tony Paul, Mick Wright, Bob Davies, Ian ‘Porky’Jones, Myatt & Perry, Fresh & Jo, Andy Wint, Neil Jackson, Pete Clements, Mike Wyer and others are part of the celebration on 101.8FM in Wolverhampton.

Station Manager Andy Walters told RadioToday: “We are extremely fortunate that there is such love for our radio heritage, especially Beacon Radio and we have presenters from as far afield as Alberta and Los Angeles who are taking part in this special weekend.”

Here’s the schedule for this weekend, which is available to listen to online via the station’s website:

Saturday April 9

7am – Chris Harper Breakfast Show
8am – Fresh & Jo (Fresh was Beacon’s longest serving DJ at 24 yrs)
10am – Stu Haycock – Beacon Sport
11am – Andy Swift & Debbi Massey
Noon – Stuart Hickman
2pm – Myatt & Perry
4pm – Alan Nicklin
6pm – Northern Soul
8pm – Niel Jackson with the Saturday Night Dance Party
10pm to Midnight – KKJ’s Disco Spectacular

Sunday April 10

4am – Mike Baker’s First Breakfast Show
7am – Bob Davies
8am – Andy Wint
9am – Mike Wyer
11am – Gordon Astley
1pm – Dick Fisher
2pm – Mick Wright – Supergold Sunday 1976
4pm – Chuck Street – Nightschool
5pm – Inside Tracks – an interview with Mike Baker
6pm – Jim Duncan – Beacon Country
7pm – Tony Paul from California
8pm – Pete Clements – The Cats Whisker
10pm – Munro Jack

North Norfolk Radio brings home the cows
Posted by Marty McFly

North Norfolk Radio brings home the cows
A small herd of Highland cattle are now finally back where they started from, thanks to North Norfolk Radio and its listeners.

 

The herd’s owner Hayley Rushworth contacted the radio station when the cattle escaped and listeners soon began calling in with sightings in villages

Haley says “I could write a book on where the cattle have been over the last few weeks. I would like to say a big thank you to North Norfolk Radio and all the listeners who called in with reports of the where the cattle had moved to”

On Friday a listener called to say the cattle had moved onto a field near Aldborough.

North Norfolk Radio presenter Graham Lewis liaised with Hayley to help guide her to the cattle – where they were rounded up and returned home.

Insight Radio rebrands to RNIB Connect Radio
Posted by Radio Today Staff

Insight Radio rebrands to RNIB Connect Radio
Changes at RNIB have resulted in a new name for the organisation’s own radio station, Insight Radio.

The station will now be known as RNIB Connect Radio, and be part of a new initiative to build a stronger community of blind and partially sighted people, their families, friends, carers and supporters; a community where people can connect with and support each other.

Initially this has brought together 24,000 former members of RNIB, RNIB Campaigns Network and Action Connect to create a wider and stronger community led by blind and partially sighted people.

RNIB Connect Radio will be an integral part of this, aiming to bring together the station’s 135,300 listeners. It will provide a platform for people to share experiences of living with little or no sight, inform and create new programming on topics of interest and be relevant to listeners throughout the UK.

Programmes and presenters will stay the same, it’s just the name which changes.

 

Katie Hopkins and Andrew Castle join LBC
Posted by Radio Today Staff

Katie Hopkins and Andrew Castle join LBC

Following the end of Olly Mann and Petrie Hosken on LBC, Global has revealed its new weekend schedule for 2016.

Katie Hopkins will host Sunday mornings on a permanent basis, following a number of guest appearances, and Andrew Castle, who is leaving Smooth Radio, returns for weekend breakfast 7-10am both Saturday and Sunday.

James Rea, MD at LBC says: “Katie has already proven to be a hugely popular guest presenter and she will now bring her unique style of straight-talking to our weekend schedule. Andrew originally joined LBC in 2013 where he achieved the highest-ever audience figures for the weekend breakfast show.”

Tom Swarbrick is getting weekend afternoons 12-3, Andrew Pierce moves to Friday evenings, from 7pm to 10pm and Steve Allen will present his Sunday morning programme live from 5am to 7am. Stig Abell is the new presenter of Sunday afternoons, 3pm to 6pm. Beverley Turner will host Saturday evenings, 6pm to 8pm.

Here’s the new weekend line-up:

Screenshot 2016-04-04 10.07.22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pictorial Musings

 

A great picture on the front of this LP in a local charity shop

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Some rather twee looking guitarists on the back of the LP cover!

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A lovely late afternoon sky

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Donald Duck coasters, never seen anything like this before!  Local Charity shop

Here is the Walt Disney Character in action !

A rather lovely old storage unit for papers and letters etc, in our local Oxfam shop!

 

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Thats all this time – feel free to send in your photos to wirewaffle@hotmail.com (all mail goes into spam and is checked by me so head up the photos “Pictorial Musings”. Thanks

 

No vinyl for me from the Daily Mail

I got slightly excited that I may qualify for a free Vinyl record album.

Reading the small print my 750 points will not even get me a £5 voucher.  The Mail prints numbers on the back of each paper, you input them and points are added to your reward points.   Last year the points nearly disappeared before I got 2000 to get a voucher.  As they say, if an offer looks too good, it probably isn’t!

From the Rewards site

FREE Classic Vinyl Album, plus 30% off a stylish record player – exclusively with The Mail on Sunday

There’s no doubting that a revival in vinyl is happening. In spite of the innovations in music and technology, there can be little substitute for the warm, intimate sound quality that a 12” delivers. That crackle and pop of the needle, the enriched sound quality, and the album cover design often an artwork in its own right. It’s no wonder we’re turning back to LP’s.

And to kick start or build on your vinyl collection, we’re giving you the exclusive chance to get a FREE* LP from over 20 LP’s – carefully selected by our music critic Tim de Lisle in today’s Event.

With everything from Bowie to the Beatles, the Stones to Springsteen and Sex Pistols, you’ll be hard pressed to choose just one. So we’re also giving you the chance to buy further LP’s for up to half the normal price!

To get your free LP, simply follow the MyMail steps below:

1. Join or sign into your account at www.mymail.co.uk

2. Enter your Unique Number from the back page of the paper on Sunday, 10 April

3. Click ‘redeem’ by Tuesday, 10 May – spending either 5,000 or 6,000 Mail Points

4. Instructions on how to claim your free record will be emailed to you within 24 hours

Or to choose from over 50 LP’s at these fantastic discounts, simply go to www.upfrontoffers.co.uk/records

PLUS, we are offering readers a fantastic saving of 30% off a stylish record player for just £29.99.

The GPO Stylo, with its shiny piano finish is a record player for everyone, for those just starting their record collection to the enthusiast who wants a fabulous easy to use unit. It’s a UK best seller!

This unit is compatible with all records and has built in speakers as well as ports to add additional speakers if required.

We’ve teamed up with GPO to offer readers the exclusive chance to get their hands on this great record player for only £29.99. Just go to www.upfrontoffers.co.uk/records

TERMS

*Free classic vinyl album offer only available to MyMail members with the required amount of Mail Points on or before 10 May. Thereafter, all orders must be received by Upfront Offers by midnight on 15 May 2016. MyMail membership, internet access and Mail Points required. Orders will be delivered by 1st June 2016. Returns only accepted on faulty goods. Any faulty items must be returned to be quality tested before a refund can be processed.This limited offer is subject to availability. Offer available to UK residents only. Offer limited to one album per customer.