Red Sands Fort

An article from the Daily Mail this time.  I have always been fascinated by fortresses off the coast!

From this article which is reproduced in full below http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3731706/The-crumbling-giants-seas-Eerie-images-abandoned-coastal-forts-built-70-years-ago-protect-London-Second-World-War.html

The crumbling giants of the seas: Eerie images of the abandoned coastal forts built 70 years ago to protect London during the Second World War

  • Red Sands Sea Forts were built in Thames Estuary in 1943, seven miles off coast of Whitstable, Kent
  • Maunsell gun towers were constructed to help gunners shoot down opposition aircrafts 
  • Huge metal structures have been abandoned since they were decommissioned in 1956 

These haunting photographs have captured the ruins of the sea forts designed to protect London against Nazi attacks during World War II.

The Red Sands Sea Forts were built in the Thames Estuary in 1943 and still tower above the waves just seven miles off the coast of Whitstable, in Kent.

The huge metal Maunsell gun towers, which were constructed to help gunners shoot down opposition aircrafts, have been abandoned since they were decommissioned in 1956.

Haunting photographs show the abandoned sea forts designed to protect London against Nazi attacks during World War II 

Haunting photographs show the abandoned sea forts designed to protect London against Nazi attacks during World War II

The huge metal Maunsell gun towers were built in the Thames Estuary in 1943, seven miles off the coast of Whitstable, in Kent 

The huge metal Maunsell gun towers were built in the Thames Estuary in 1943, seven miles off the coast of Whitstable, in Kent

The forts, constructed to help gunners shoot down opposition aircrafts, have been abandoned since they were decommissioned in 1956 

The forts, constructed to help gunners shoot down opposition aircrafts, have been abandoned since they were decommissioned in 1956

Polish photographer, Marzena Grabczynska Lorenc, took the pictures of the battered gun towers.

She said: ‘It’s hard to imagine how it felt to be stationed there during WWII and spend months inside of the forts surrounded by water.

‘When I saw them, those huge towers were standing alone in the ocean all abandoned and forgotten.

‘I have always been drawn to these kind of places, where mystery and history goes hand in hand. These forts have been left to rot since their decommission.’

Three sets of Maunsell Forts were built in the Estuary - the Nore forts off the coast of Sheerness, which have now been demolished, and the Red Sands and Shivering Sands forts further out

Polish photographer, Marzena Grabczynska Lorenc, took the eerie pictures of the battered gun towers

She described the Maunsell forts as an 'important part of history' and said their 'incredible design' should be preserved

She described the Maunsell forts as an ‘important part of history’ and said their ‘incredible design’ should be preserved

Each fort became home to 265 men during the Second World War, from both the army and the navy

‘They were built to defend London against German planes – they are an important part of history and their incredible design should be preserved,’ she said.

‘Where else can you see massive bunkers standing on long legs in the middle of the ocean looking like invaders from a work of science-fiction?

‘Now, they are just empty, rusty, and there’s a really eerie feeling.’

 The Thames Estuary forts were assembled after the main London Blitz and they jointly shot down 22 enemy aircraft, 30 V1 flying bombs, and also accounted for a U-boat

 The Thames Estuary forts were assembled after the main London Blitz and they jointly shot down 22 enemy aircraft, 30 V1 flying bombs, and also accounted for a U-boat

Charity Project Redsands to protect the future of the forts

It was created to help stabilise and renovate the forts with the hope of using them in the future

Charity Project Redsands was created to help stabilise and renovate the forts with the hope of using them in the future

Last year, retired businessman David Marriot Cooper unveiled plans to convert the forts into a luxury hotel complex

Last year, retired businessman David Marriot Cooper unveiled plans to convert the forts into a luxury hotel complex

THAMES ESTUARY SEA FORTS 

The giant fortresses, named after their designer Guy Maunsell, were constructed to protect the UK from aerial or naval attacks from Nazi Germany.

Three sets of Maunsell Forts were built in the Estuary to this design – the Nore forts off the coast of Sheerness, which have now been demolished, and the Red Sands and Shivering Sands forts, further out.

These bastions were assembled after the main London Blitz and they jointly shot down 22 enemy aircraft, 30 V1 flying bombs, and also accounted for a U-boat – undoubtedly saving hundreds of lives.

The seven towers of Red Sands were placed approximately six miles off Minster, Isle of Sheppey, over the period July 23 to September 3, 1943 and each fort became home to 265 men, from both the army and the navy.

A few years ago, Project Redsands was created to help stabilise and renovate the forts with the hope of using them in the future.

In 2015, retired businessman David Marriot Cooper unveiled plans to convert the forts into a luxury hotel complex after being approached by the charity.

He has written to authorities about the idea but is still looking for a hotel developer to fund the project.

Ms Marzena said she faced great difficulty when exploring the inside of the towers, with some of the less stable ones rocking due to high winds.

The 51-year-old said: ‘Standing inside the fort, you can feel it slightly moving with stronger winds.

‘My husband and I met with a captain and we boarded the X-Pilot boat as we were greeted with a sunrise and the abandoned sea giants.

‘We were only able to go inside the safest one. Inside, the forts are almost empty and the rusty walls are stripped bare – I would not want to be there during a big storm.’

He has written to authorities about the idea but is still looking for a hotel developer to fund the project 

Ms Marzena said she faced great difficulty when exploring the inside of the towers

She said some of the less stable ones rocking due to high winds

Ms Marzena said she faced great difficulty when exploring the inside of the towers, with some of the less stable ones rocking due to high winds

 The giant fortresses are named after their designer Guy Maunsell and were constructed to protect the UK against aerial and naval attack 

She said the huge forts are almost completely empty on the inside and the rusty walls are stripped bare

Pictured is the handle of the door to one of the sea Maunsell forts

She said the huge forts are almost completely empty on the inside and the rusty walls are stripped bare. Pictured is the handle of the door to one of the sea Maunsell forts

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