Pictorial Musings

What was the first album that you bought? The one below was my first album

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If you have time to listen to the video below – you will hear the tunes that reached my ears in my early teens!


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A peace lily in our front room, flowering and being generally lovely!

The Peace Lily Plant or Spathiphyllum first came to Europe in 1824 when it was found by Gustav Wallis in the Colombian jungle. Wallis is remembered for his discovery in the Peace Lily’slatin name of S. Wallis. Along with the lush foliage, it’s a cheap plant to buy, simple to care for with easy to follow care instructions and will also help filter the surrounding air of various toxins. When it comes to the meaning of the Peace Lily name this is down to the flowers with the white raised spathe looking like a white flag of surrender.

 

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Daffodils, last Saturday at Nettlebed – site of the Sue Ryder sale.

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Buttercups in the grass at Nettlebed

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Weeds including the stinging nettle, in a public footpath on Saturday.

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This lovely cat visits us a least twice each day, and likes being stroked, and enjoys a sleep here as well!

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The flowers of a Clivia Plant. We gave one to our friends, and it likes their front porch, its has flowered spectacularly.  We have had no success with the parent plant!

Clivia make striking plants for the house and conservatory. They are grown for their bold strap-shaped, dark-green leaves and trumpet-shaped red, yellow, orange or cream flowers borne in groups on stout stems. Clivia are evergreen perennials with swollen bulb-like bases and originate from low-altitude woodlands in South Africa.

Quick facts

Common name Forest lily, caffre lily, kaffir lily, thong lily, boslelie
Botanical name Clivia
Group Houseplant (evergreen perennial)
Flowering time Spring to summer
Planting time Any season
Height and spread 45cm (18in) by 30cm (1ft)
Aspect Bright filtered or indirect light through glass
Hardiness Frost tender
Difficulty Easy to moderate

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