Radio Newsbeat

Things have come a long way since I published the Wireless Waffle as a newsletter advertised in Mojo Magazine. It is also some time since 1999 when we launched as a website and now a blog.  We now cover things other than radio, so hopefully you enjoy the other topics.  One thing though, now with internet and wi fi radio, you can generally listen to all the radio stations and shows mentioned in these radio newsbeats.  That reminds me that I named this type of radio news selection in the same vain as Caroline Newsbeat, the name Radio Caroline used in the 1960s!

 

From the Radio Today Site

Date set for networked BBC evening show
July 18th, 2012 12:52 pm | 23 Comments

BBC Commissioning has released tender details of the new all-local radio evening programme, which is set to start on January 7th 2013.

The speech-led show, to be broadcast on all 39 local radio stations in England, will air from 7pm till 10pm.

Applications are invited from all independent production companies who can clearly demonstrate relevant experience and expertise, the BBC says. All offers should reach them by 12 noon on August 23rd 2012, with decisions made by September 14th. The winning proposal will then just over three months to arrange the new show.

The contract on offer will be for an initial 12 month period, with an option to extend by up to a further 24 months by mutual agreement and will be worth around £150,000. The presenter or presenters will be paid separately by the BBC.

This programme forms part of the outcome of the Delivering Quality First process and follows the review of the BBC Local Radio service licence carried out by the BBC Trust. It will reach 17.4 per cent of adults (7.3m), the majority of which is over 50 years old.

Local Radio stations will still opt-out for major local breaking news stories, and scheduled sports coverage.

Radio freelancers will for the first time be eligible for up to £1,500 worth of funding for training from the BBC and Creative Skillset.

Experienced freelancers will be able to use the funds to pay for 80% of their training costs (up to the £1,500 maximum) for courses in areas that have been identified by a panel as priorities for the industry.

Funding is available for courses that cover craft & technical skills including editing, social media, multiplatform content development and distribution and sound engineering, or business, teamwork and management skills.

Creative Skillset’s Chief Executive, Dinah Caine, said: “Digital technology has transformed our radio industry, so we are really pleased to be able to help our radio freelancers access the training they need to help the UK remain the world’s foremost producer of compelling radio programming.”

Director of the BBC Academy, Anne Morrison, said: “Thanks to a growing radio freelance market and BBC Audio & Music further opening up production to the independent sector, it is more important than ever that UK radio freelancers remain highly skilled. This funding will help future-proof our radio talent and ensure that the industry as a whole goes from strength to strength.”

For more information, or to apply for funding, see creativeskillset.org/freemoney.

BFBS Radio presenter and producer Neil Moore is taking his Club Culture Live show on its annual summer road trip.

This year he’s heading to Ibiza and Germany to broadcast live on FM across the forces world and on DAB Digital Radio in the UK.

Neil will be joined by well-known guest DJs to entertain listeners with coverage from Ibiza’s Sunset Strip and the Nature One Festival in Germany. He told us: “The aim of the shows is to allow those away on Ops or at home to tune in and submerse themselves in the energy and atmosphere of Ibiza and one of Europe’s biggest dance festivals, even if it’s for just a few short hours.”

“The most enjoyable part of the tour is even though it’s a lot of ‘awake time’ I always seem to come away revitalized. If just a small part of that feeling transmits itself to someone serving thousands of miles away from where they would rather be on a hot summer night, then it’s job done.”

In Ibiza Neil will present radio shows from the Café Mambo Studio in San Antonio. Guest DJs, including Andy Daniels from Hed Kandi, Dan Kelly, and Woody van Eyden plus the residents from Cream will join him to chat on air and create live mixes on Saturday 21st July, Saturday 11th August and Saturday 1st September from 6 until 9pm.

From Germany more than eleven hours of coverage will form the Club Culture Dance Weekender from Friday 3rd to Sunday 5th August. A mix of open-air House and Trance dance music will be broadcast live so that listeners can experience the atmosphere alongside an estimated 60,000 clubbers at the Nature One Festival.

Neil will be joined by Phil Bignell from BFBS Technology to cover the action and beats from the various venues.

Viewpoint: Andrew Harrison on Radio 1
July 19th, 2012 9:40 am

Andrew Harrison is Chief Executive of RadioCentre – the trade body for commercial radio. Today he shares his view on the challenge ahead for BBC Radio 1′s Ben Cooper.
Harrison Commends Cooper’s Courage

Even before he was appointed controller of Radio 1 in October last year, Ben Cooper would have been well aware that the key challenge facing him was how he went about reducing the average age of the station’s millions of listeners.

It’s an important challenge for two reasons. Firstly, because for all of us working in radio, we need to work doubly hard to ensure young listeners enjoy our output and develop the same listening habits as older generations. That’s not easy when we’re competing with on-line music jukeboxes, with their breath-taking explosion of choice, available on everything from MP3 players to smartphones and IPTV. The BBC has to lead that effort. Why? Because its public service funding model is perfectly suited to engaging those difficult to reach younger audiences. By contrast, teenage and younger audiences hold less value to advertisers, making this kind of output financially unviable to the commercial sector. Fact.

Secondly, Radio 1, which receives £50 million from the licence fee, is the service best equipped to reach those younger listeners – and it’s failing to do so. Radio 1 has a service commitment to deliver an audience aged between 15 and 29 years old – but its average listener age is 32. The BBC Trust has consistently highlighted the fact that the average age remains too high and requires action. Cooper himself has acknowledged his ‘metric of success is going to be average age’.

So, Cooper has made a good start on a strategic imperative for the BBC and all of radio –ensuring young listeners fall in love with radio over and over again. He has made some big decisions early on in his tenure, attempting to embrace a younger audience by changing the station line-up and moving on many DJs who were not just colleagues, but friends. Cooper understands that although many younger listeners may like Chris Moyles, they do not identify as well with him as they do presenters of their own age. They also want to listen to music not talk.

So, we all hope that Cooper’s subtle hand on the tiller will embrace a younger audience. As for ‘festival dads’ such as myself, Tim Davie or even Lord Patten , there should be enough places on the dial across Radio 2 and 6 Music – let alone Absolute Radio, Planet Rock and elsewhere – to satisfy our daily radio cravings.

And, we can all still tune in to a favourite show on Radio 1 every so often. But the average age of the audience day-in, day-out, hour after hour should sit comfortably within the age remit for which the station is given its service licence.

There is still work to do – whether on distinctiveness, music policy or the public service output of the station – but Cooper is making some bold choices and big decisions now to plan for the future. I commend him for making the correct one for radio in this case. Without it, we’ll all have fewer listeners in 10 years’ time.

In the week before the start of the Olympics, Radio 5 live breakfast presenter Nicky Campbell will be testing what effect a banned substance has on athletic performance – by taking it.

Nicky will see what effect the banned stimulant methylhexaneamine (MHA, also known as DMAA) has on sprinting, rowing and cycling.

The performance supplement available over-the-counter in health shops, contains MHA, a substance banned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). Many athletes have tested positive for MHA in the past, including 100m world champion, Yohan Blake. Other sportsmen from Rugby Union, Rugby League and football have also been banned for testing positive for the stimulant.

Nicky will record his times sprinting, rowing and cycling over set distances, and then, following a course of the supplement will test to see how his performance has improved.

Sir Tom joins Radio 2 Live in Hyde Park
July 19th, 2012 1:55 pm | Leave a comment

Sir Tom Jones will join the line-up for this year’s Radio 2 Live in Hyde Park on Sunday, September 9th.

He joins a line-up including Jessie J, Status Quo, Mick Hucknall and Paloma Faith at the £35-a-ticket listener gig.

Jeff Smith, Head of Music BBC Radio 2, said: “Music is at the heart of Radio 2′s output and to have Sir Tom added to an already remarkable line-up guarantees that Radio 2 Live In Hyde Park is going to be an amazing day and a wonderful celebration of music.”

Last year, over 25,000 people attended the event, which included live performances from Gary Barlow, Lenny Kravitz, James Blunt, Beverley Knight, Jools Holland and his Rhythm and Blues Orchestra and Caro Emerald amongst others.

The concert will be broadcast live on Radio 2, with highlights from the concert across the station’s daytime shows and website.

Def Leppard’s Joe Elliott reaches his 100th radio show and to celebrate he’s got the rest of band to help him with the programme.

This week’s show features all five members of Def Leppard as they choose the songs that inspired them to become one of the most successful bands of the last 20 years.

“It’s amazing that the 100th show has come around so quickly. I thought by getting the rest of the band involved that it would be a great way to mark this event and make it extra special” said Joe.

Joe Elliott first started broadcasting with Planet Rock in 2010, and each week has chosen his favourite songs ever recorded from 70′s glam to modern rock. The show airs every Saturday at 6pm the national digital station.

Ofcom has awarded three new community radio licences for services in Scotland, including an FM licence to Celtic Music Radio which currently broadcasts on AM.

The two new stations are Sound of Mull Radio on the Isle of Mull and Iona and Camglen Radio in South Lanarkshire.

Sound of Mull Radio will reflect island life, culturally, linguistically and socially, giving a voice to islanders, whilst Camglen Radio will be a local service for Cambuslang, Rutherglen and surrounding areas broadcasting content that reflects the interests, needs, richness and diversity of the communities served.

Two other groups, Paisley FM and Paisley Ark FM were considered but not awarded a licence on this occasion.

Celtic Music Radio will now hand-back the 1530 AM licence. Each new licence if for a five year period and will commence when each station starts broadcasting – within two years from today.

The new awards mean that 257 community radio licences have been awarded. In total, 19 groups applied for a licence in Scotland.

Ofcom has awarded three new community radio licences for services in Scotland, including an FM licence to Celtic Music Radio which currently broadcasts on AM.

The two new stations are Sound of Mull Radio on the Isle of Mull and Iona and Camglen Radio in South Lanarkshire.

Sound of Mull Radio will reflect island life, culturally, linguistically and socially, giving a voice to islanders, whilst Camglen Radio will be a local service for Cambuslang, Rutherglen and surrounding areas broadcasting content that reflects the interests, needs, richness and diversity of the communities served.

Two other groups, Paisley FM and Paisley Ark FM were considered but not awarded a licence on this occasion.

Celtic Music Radio will now hand-back the 1530 AM licence. Each new licence if for a five year period and will commence when each station starts broadcasting – within two years from today.

The new awards mean that 257 community radio licences have been awarded. In total, 19 groups applied for a licence in Scotland.

From the Digital Spy Site
Lauren Laverne: ‘BBC 6 Music offers a lot of freedom’
Published Thursday, Jul 19 2012, 10:57 BST | By Mayer Nissim

Lauren Laverne has said that BBC 6 Music offers her “a lot of freedom” as a DJ.

The former Kenickie frontwoman told Stylist that things also felt “completely different” at the station after the BBC Trust gave it a reprieve from its planned closure in 2010.

Lauren Laverne

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