Radio Newsbeat

From the Media UK site

From Media Guardian. Posted November 3 2011, 9.29pm
Melvyn Bragg zips back into the past to rewrite history: just another quiet news day on the spoof show.

The Right Word: Herman Cain and a vast leftwing conspiracy | Sadhbh Walshe
From Media Guardian. Posted November 3 2011, 8.56pm
It’s been a busy week for Ann Coulter and Dick Morris, touring the studios to defend Cain from sexual harassment allegations.

Singapore’s DAB switchoff explained
From Media UK editorial pick. Posted November 3 2011, 1.18pm
Gunnar Garfors explains the reasons for Singapore’s decision to switch off DAB transmissions at the end of this year.

Listening to BBC radio overseas | Ask Jack
From Media Guardian. Posted November 3 2011, 1.05pm
Augusto Odell wants to listen to the BBC’s national radio stations, but he lives in Italy..

BBC to open vast radio archive online
From Media Network Weblog. Posted November 3 2011, 12.50pm
The BBC is to introduce a new radio website, codenamed ‘Audiopedia’, to contain virtually its entire archive of speech radio programmes going back to the 1940s.

JLS performs for Capital.. in a toilet
From Radio Today. Posted November 3 2011, 12.44pm
Trap 2 becomes the toilet to ‘go’ in after World’s Smallest Gig.

Gold supports Prostate Cancer Charity
From Radio Today. Posted November 3 2011, 12.02pm
First activity to raise money for charity is taking part in November.

Free Radio Santa Cruz is back on the air
From Media Network Weblog. Posted November 3 2011, 11.45am
After an eviction from its previous transmitter site, the unlicensed Free Radio Santa Cruz has found a new site and restarted transmissions on 101.1 FM.

Andrew Harrison’s Right to Reply speech
From Radio Today. Posted November 3 2011, 11.14am
Commercial radio replies to the BBC Director General Mark Thompson’s keynote.

BBC Radio to celebrate 25 years of the “Phantom Phenomenon”
From The Stage. Posted November 3 2011, 11.00am

From Radio Netherlands Media Blog

BBC to open vast radio archive online
November 3rd, 2011 – 12:50 UTC
by Andy Sennitt.
3 comments

The BBC is to introduce a new radio website, codenamed ‘Audiopedia’, to contain virtually its entire archive of speech radio programmes going back to the 1940s. The service is being developed for launch “within the next 12 months”, said Tim Davie, director of BBC Audio and Music. “Audiopedia”, its working title, may yet become its formal name, he added.

“The BBC is working on how best to present Audiopedia at the moment but most people will probably access the new on demand content via other pieces of related content they are already listening to across the BBC website,” he explained.

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BBC to open vast radio archive online
November 3rd, 2011 – 12:50 UTC
by Andy Sennitt.
3 comments

The BBC is to introduce a new radio website, codenamed ‘Audiopedia’, to contain virtually its entire archive of speech radio programmes going back to the 1940s. The service is being developed for launch “within the next 12 months”, said Tim Davie, director of BBC Audio and Music. “Audiopedia”, its working title, may yet become its formal name, he added.

“The BBC is working on how best to present Audiopedia at the moment but most people will probably access the new on demand content via other pieces of related content they are already listening to across the BBC website,” he explained.

by Andy Sennitt.

A meeting of BBC National Union of Journalists (NUJ) reps has unanimously agreed to call for a vote of no confidence in Mark Thompson – an unprecedented act against the Director General in the corporation’s history. The NUJ says “the wide-ranging cuts to the corporation – including the loss of 2,000 jobs – will cause irreparable damage to the best journalism in the world, dramatically impact on the reputation of the service internationally and will lead to a devastating reduction in public service broadcasting across the UK’s regions and nations.”

The NUJ will now be asking its members in the BBC to signal their support of no confidence in Mark Thompson. Michelle Stanistreet, NUJ general secretary, said: “This shows the depth of anger felt by journalists across the BBC and their outrage at the lack of leadership from the top of the corporation. The BBC’s future is under attack as a result of the freeze on the licence fee settlement driven through by the Coalition government. The director general should be fighting for the BBC, not inflicting cuts in areas that will cause irreparable damage to services and inevitably compromise quality journalism and programming.

“NUJ members are committed to defending jobs and quality journalism at the BBC and we are asking readers, listeners and viewers to join with us in this battle. And that is why we will be organising the no confidence ballot against Mark Thompson, the architect of this butchery.”

(Source: NUJ)

Media Network Rotating Header Image
BBC to open vast radio archive online
November 3rd, 2011 – 12:50 UTC
by Andy Sennitt.
3 comments

The BBC is to introduce a new radio website, codenamed ‘Audiopedia’, to contain virtually its entire archive of speech radio programmes going back to the 1940s. The service is being developed for launch “within the next 12 months”, said Tim Davie, director of BBC Audio and Music. “Audiopedia”, its working title, may yet become its formal name, he added.

“The BBC is working on how best to present Audiopedia at the moment but most people will probably access the new on demand content via other pieces of related content they are already listening to across the BBC website,” he explained.

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Posted in: For Consumers, For Media Professionals, Full feed.
NUJ calls for vote of no confidence in BBC DG
November 3rd, 2011 – 12:27 UTC
by Andy Sennitt.
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A meeting of BBC National Union of Journalists (NUJ) reps has unanimously agreed to call for a vote of no confidence in Mark Thompson – an unprecedented act against the Director General in the corporation’s history. The NUJ says “the wide-ranging cuts to the corporation – including the loss of 2,000 jobs – will cause irreparable damage to the best journalism in the world, dramatically impact on the reputation of the service internationally and will lead to a devastating reduction in public service broadcasting across the UK’s regions and nations.”

The NUJ will now be asking its members in the BBC to signal their support of no confidence in Mark Thompson. Michelle Stanistreet, NUJ general secretary, said: “This shows the depth of anger felt by journalists across the BBC and their outrage at the lack of leadership from the top of the corporation. The BBC’s future is under attack as a result of the freeze on the licence fee settlement driven through by the Coalition government. The director general should be fighting for the BBC, not inflicting cuts in areas that will cause irreparable damage to services and inevitably compromise quality journalism and programming.

“NUJ members are committed to defending jobs and quality journalism at the BBC and we are asking readers, listeners and viewers to join with us in this battle. And that is why we will be organising the no confidence ballot against Mark Thompson, the architect of this butchery.”

(Source: NUJ)

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Press freedom to be debated at Angolan conference
November 3rd, 2011 – 12:16 UTC
by Andy Sennitt.
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Press freedom in the global context and community radios at the service of citizens, will top the opening debates of the Media Ministry’s consultative council, to be held from 3-5 November in Luena, capital of the eastern Moxico province. The event’s spokesperson, Drumond Jaime, told the press that the inclusion of the debate on press freedom shows the ministry’s desire to elucidate and debate the issue in an open and scientific manner.

With regards to community radios, he explained that the ministry outlined a project aimed at encouraging the emerging of these means of information at all districts of the country, for a greater closeness and interaction of the media sector with the population. The reports of the activities carried out by the ministry and its provincial departments, as well as of public media firms (Public television, radio, Edições Novembro and JA daily newspapers/ANGOP) and other relating companies, shall be discussed and presented during the council, which will happen under the motto “Modernising the media sector for a better service to the citizen”.

(Source: Angola Press)

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Free Radio Santa Cruz is back on the air
November 3rd, 2011 – 11:45 UTC
by Andy Sennitt.
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After an eviction from its previous transmitter site, the unlicensed Free Radio Santa Cruz has found a new site and restarted transmissions on 101.1 FM. The collectively run, anti-corporate, community supported station has been providing Santa Cruz, California, with alternative programming to counter mainstream corporate and NPR stations since 1995.

(Source: indybay.org)

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Denmark’s Radio 100 launches classical music station
November 2nd, 2011 – 16:30 UTC
by Andy Sennitt.
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Danish commercial broadcaster Radio 100 has launched a classical music radio station. Since last Friday Radio Klassisk transmits on 90.0 and 106.9 FM in Zealand and 106.2 FM in the eastern part of central Jutland.

Radio Klassisk hopes to profit from the partial disappearance from FM of the public classical music network P2. Its FM frequencies have been taken over by commercial radio news station 24syv [24/7]. P2 now has to share the FM frequencies of P1, meaning it’s only available in the evening and night hours.

Radio Klassisk hopes to attract former P2 listener. The station has a format similar to Classic FM in the Netherlands and the UK: short light classical pieces. For the time being non-stop music is being broadcast without advertising. Presented programmes will be introduced later. Soon the five major regional orchestras in Denmark will be heard regularly on Radio Klassisk.

(Source: RS/RadioWereld.NL)

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Not strictly radio but interesting!

by Andy Sennitt.

Alexandra Palace – the iconic North London entertainment venue and birthplace of the world’s first regular high-definition public television broadcast – will join forces with the BBC to celebrate 75 years of TV. The first broadcast took place on 2 November 1936.

On Saturday 5 and Sunday 6 November 2011 a series of free activities for the public will be staged at ‘Ally Pally’ to encourage the public to explore the past and discover the future of television. Not least, they will be given the rare opportunity of taking a tour of the famous BBC Studios where history was made on 2 November 1936 – and worldwide communication and entertainment was transformed beyond recognition.

The Mayor of London Boris Johnson said: “The 75th anniversary of the world’s first television broadcast service by the BBC from Alexandra Palace is a fantastic opportunity to reflect on London’s role as a pioneer and innovator. With master-planning underway to regenerate the iconic Alexandra Palace site for future generations to enjoy, it is a chance to celebrate the great achievements of public service broadcasting and also discover how world-renowned colleges like Ravensbourne are helping to shape the future of television and digital media.”

As visitors explore and delve into TV’s colourful past through a series of interactive and immersive audio visual displays featuring rarely-seen BBC footage, the words “This is direct from Alexandra Palace” – made famous by one of the first television presenters Elizabeth Cowell – will be heard once more from within the BBC studios.

Matt Cooke, Chair of Alexandra Park & Palace Trust, said: “The BBC’s place in the history of Alexandra Palace was sealed when the first public service broadcast in the world was made from the building in 1936. Not only did the event pave the way for a new kind of social entertainment, but it also prompted technological advances in the way we communicate with each other which still impact on us today. The Trustees are delighted to be co-hosting a weekend of interactive and futuristic activities with the BBC to mark 75 years since this important milestone in UK and world history.”

Head of BBC History, Robert Seatter, added: “On this momentous 75th anniversary, we are delighted to be working with Alexandra Palace to open up these unique studios where television really began. We hope that this exciting open weekend will help visitors to celebrate television in all its diversity – old and new, technical and aesthetic, serious and fun.”

When the BBC leased the studios at Alexandra Palace from 1935 – 1981, it was afforded incredible reception capabilities and broadcasting opportunities. The building, standing at over 306ft above sea level, provides outstanding views across the city and – crucially – guaranteed BBC production staff at the time close proximity to Broadcasting House – the corporation’s headquarters in central London.

Withstanding the Second World War years – when television equipment was commandeered for defence purposes and the Alexandra Palace transmitter was re-tuned to defend London from Nazi bombers – the studios became the corporation’s primary production centre for television broadcasts until the 1950s. Over the years landmark programmes and historic events including the 1953 Coronation, the News and Open University television were made there, entertaining growing numbers of families in Britain.

Visitors to Alexandra Palace on the weekend of 5 and 6 November will be able to take centre stage and prepare to go ‘on air’, made up in authentic 1930s TV style (with blue lips and eyes and white pancake facepaint)! They will also be able to share their memories of the BBC and ‘Ally Pally’ in front of the cameras and sample 1930s inspired food from the ‘BBC canteen’.

For those who are more interested in what television has to offer in the future, students of the world-renowned digital media and design college Ravensbourne will be on site to provide demonstrations of the latest innovations in 3D TV. Members of the public will also have the opportunity of recording the news for the cameras and later watching their performances back on YouTube.

Cameras will roll from 11am – 4.30pm on both 5 and 6 November. Entry is free, but anyone wishing to take a tour of the BBC studios needs to call 0208 365 4321 (+44 208 365 4321 from outside the UK) to secure a timed ticket.

(Source: alexandrapalace.com)

From the digital spy website

BBC licence fee could extend to catch-up TV on iPlayer
Published Monday, Oct 31 2011, 11:06 GMT | By Andrew Laughlin | 34 comments
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BBC iPlayer on TV

© BBC
The BBC licence fee may be extended to viewing via video on-demand and catch-up TV services such as BBC iPlayer, as part of a review being considered by the government.

Current TV licensing rules stipulate that a TV licence is required to watch television content “as it is being broadcast”, whether that is on the TV set, online or via mobile platforms.

However, there is a grey area around whether people need a licence to access catch-up services such as BBC iPlayer, offering on-demand access to shows that have already aired.

Catch-up and on-demand platform iPlayer generated 32m requests from users for content every week in September, breaking down as 10m for radio and 22m for television.

The emerging strength of internet-enabled TVs is expected to intensify the usage, as iPlayer is already available on connected TV services from Samsung, Sony and others, while an ‘optimised for TV’ version launched on Sony’s PS3 in August.

Nest year, the BBC-backed YouView is expected to go live, bringing VOD and web services to millions of homes as an upgrade to Freeview and Freesat.

The Department for Culture, Media and Sport is now considering making changes to the licence fee to reflect the emergence of new viewing technologies, reports The Guardian.

“Government is aware of developing technologies and the changing viewing habits of those who watch television programmes,” said DCMS.

“How the BBC is funded as these issues evolve is a matter the department will need to address in the near future.”

Ministers are currently evaluating a new communications bill to be enacted before the end of the current parliament. A green paper is expected to be published around Christmas.

Culture secretary Jeremy Hunt said last year that the changing way people are watching TV, particularly online and on IPTV, could soon make the annual licence fee obsolete. But he also said that it is “not going to be possible to have a tax every time anyone buys a computer”.

Last December, the BBC revealed that it had successfully prosecuted people watching television over the internet without a valid TV licence for the first time.

However, the corporation feels that wholesale changes to licence fee collection methods are not necessary, as its research shows that just 0.2% of households exclusively watch TV via catch-up.

A spokesman added: “We believe the current system works very efficiently and do not see a need to change its scope at present.”

A radical report by free-market thinktank the Adam Smith Institute last year claimed that the growth in online viewing and video on-demand platforms has made a “licence” to broadcast obsolete.

The report said that the TV licence fee, which funds the BBC, should be scrapped and the corporation shifted to a voluntary subscription funding model.
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